Reviewing Rebel Voices: The Rise of Votes for Women

About this book:

Beautifully illustrates the strength of the women across the world who fought for their right to vote in different ways … as much a celebration of difference and diversity as it is a chronicle of women’s rights – Stylist

To celebrate 2018 – the Year of the Woman, and the anniversary of women winning the vote in the UK – this is a timely, beautiful and bold compendium of women around the world who said Time’s Up on inequality.

The book shares the story of the suffragettes, and of their sisters campaigning for equal rights globally. Discover how 40,000 Russian women marched through St Petersburg demanding their rights, one Canadian woman changed opinions with a play, and Kuwaiti women protested via text message. And read how women climbed mountains, walked a lion through the streets of Paris, and starved themselves, all in the name of having a voice and a choice. Tracing its history from New Zealand at the end of the 19th century, follow this empowering movement as it spread from Oceania to Europe and the Americas, then Africa and Asia up to the present day. And be inspired by the brave women who rioted, rallied and refused to give up.

Stunningly illustrated by Eve Lloyd Knight, this book celebrates the women who stood up, spoke up, and refused to behave, rebelling against convention to give women everywhere a voice. And it shows what can be achieved when women stand together, and say enough.

Publisher: Wren and Rook
Author: Louise K Stewart
Illustrator: Eve Lloyd Knight
My Review:

Firstly, lets stand back and appreciate such a strong, vibrant, unashamed cover. For the first time ever i really felt like i could judge a book by it’s cover because it revealed to me from the very beginning that it was going to be full of strong women, with powerful messages and it didn’t disappoint.

Sitting on the shelf in the book store it stood out from everything around it and definitely beckoned me towards it.

I have loved this book and took no time in telling the publishers that too because it really struck a cord with me. What I have liked so much about it is that it shares tales about women’s stories from every corner of the globe, sometimes almost simultaneously fighting, marching, rioting, petitioning and otherwise standing up to for Women to have their voices recognised.

In the UK we hear all about The Suffragettes winning their right to vote, to be counted, after suffering so long fighting to have their places in decision making cemented. This book though tells you about all the women, every where who were doing just the same. Some began earlier- like New Zealand in 1893 who started a ripple that turned into a wave which thankfully spread around the world. Some came later but were equally as important. What i really liked and felt was different was that it was set out by location as well as by date which i found really useful. I felt that this book played such an important role in informing young girls (and boys) about international figures as well as home grown ones as it showed how we all worked together under one ultimate goal and how we succeeded.

This is a brilliant book and I urge you to read all about those radical rebel voices from all around the world!

Thank you to Toppsta and Wren and Rook for my copy of this book.

megan g grace nicholson . munchkin meggie . rebel voices

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Reviewing Alex Sparrow and the Really Big Stink

About this book:

Alex Sparrow is a super-agent in training. He is also a human lie-detector. Working with Jess, who can communicate with animals, they must find out why their friends – and enemies – are all changing into polite and well-behaved pupils. And exactly who is behind it all.

Alex Sparrow and the Really Big Stink is a funny, mid-grade novel full of farts, jokes and superhero references. Oh, and a rather clever goldfish called Bob. In a world where kids’ flaws and peculiarities are being erased out of existence, Alex and Jess must rely on what makes them different to save the day.

Author: Jennifer Killick

Illustrator: Heath McKenzie

Publisher: Firefly Press Ltd

My Review:

Somewhere between The Demon Headmaster and Alex Rider this book is packed with humour, spies and mysterious goings on!

I found this book very funny from the very beginning- it’s definitely my humour, a bit of serious and a bit of silly mixed together.

I love the use pop culture references, from the word go Jennifer has you feeling like you might just go to school with Alex, you may just casually bump into him in the playground perhaps because he makes reference to the things that you know and the things that are current. It’s very funny and appealing- although i’m not sure how that may sit with readers in years to come but right now it’s great!

The book is hilarious and Alex’s ‘power’ is simply genius and i felt quite unique- we get a lot of rehashing the same old ideas in exactly the same way and this felt quite fresh and not at all done!

Brilliant, i read it all in one sitting and i’m thoroughly looking forward to the next instalment. 

alex sparrow and the really big stink

Reviewing A Christmas Carol: A Charles Dickens Search and Find Book

About this book:

Discover the world of Charles Dickens with Search & Find A Christmas Carol. The popular, magical story is retold in beautifully illustrated search & find pages where you can find the characters on the busy pages and follow them through the story. Each page is full of characters to find and details to spot in the busy scenes, such as Scrooge in his counting house, the arrival of Jacob Marley’s ghost, the Fezziwig Christmas party and the Cratchit family at home on Christmas Day and many more. Beautiful illustrations are accompanied by abridged text, perfect for sharing with little ones and introducing them to Charles Dickens’ stories.

Author: Charles Dickens

Illustrator: Louise Pigott

Publisher: Templar Publishing

a christmas carol

My Review:

I tried reading A Christmas Carol last year but i struggled to get into it, i suppose it was the language difference. I was keen to read it as so many stories adapt the original and i wanted to see where they derived from, alas at the time, like i say i just couldn’t get though it.

I really liked this search and find version of the book, not only did it give a very very shortened version of the story- think basically ‘this happened, then this happened, then this happened’- it also was completely and utterly beautifully visual. The artwork suits it well and is lovely, every page is a real delight.

I think this book is a great introduction to Charles Dickens classic tale and it has made me want to try reading the original again, while appreciating this book at the same time.

a christmas carol

Thank you to Toppsta and Templar Publishing for my copy of this book.

Slaves for the Isabella by Julia Edwards

About the book:

What if freedom wasn’t something you could take for granted? What if you had to fight for it?

If there’s one thing Joe Hopkins knows better than anyone, it’s that the past can be very uncomfortable. But life in wealthy Georgian Bristol seems surprisingly civilized. Lucy’s house is light and airy, and there are sandwiches and tea with sugar.

Author: Julia Edwards

Artwork: Bespoke Book Covers

Publisher: Laverstock Publishing

My review:

I had the absolute pleasure of reading Slaves for the Isabella before it came out. I was completely new to Julia Edwards work so my expectations were built only on what i had read by others who had sampled her work. They said some wonderful things and they were not fibbing!

I thought it was a wonderful mixture of fact and fiction, as a child with a wide eyed view of the world i enjoyed Joe’s growing conscience and sense of right and wrong as i could empathise and identify with this myself. Although i have not read the previous books, i found Joe instantly likeable and i would be interested to go back through the previous books to see Joe’s progression throughout the series.

The charm of the book was that it was neither set entirely in the past or the present, it straddled the line between the two time periods which really opened up the story telling. I think Julia has created something truly wonderful here, her blend of fact and fiction is expertly executed. What i really liked was that Julia never sugar coated the way people were treated previously and detailed what it was like in the time period, showing a divide that existed so prominently that it is only when we have honest accounts that we can really understand the magnitude of the events. I never once felt that her blend of fantasy and fact diminished this and for that i was truly grateful. I was compelled to read the book during Black History Month as it felt it was an appropriate way of marking it’s 30th year.

I was fascinated by Julia’s account of Georgian Britain and it’s an era that i think i will be delving into a way from the book. This was another thing i thought Julia accomplished very well, whetting my appetite for learning about history while also telling a gripping story.

It was a thoroughly good read and if i’m honest there were many moments when i felt frustrated, angry, overjoyed and i genuinely didn’t want it to end!

Julia painted a picture of a world that i felt i had stepped into and when the time came to leave it, i simply wasn’t ready- in a good way of course.

My only regret was that i hadn’t read the first 4 but thankfully they are out in the world for me to discover!

Thank you to Julia Edwards for sending me a copy of Slaves for the Isabella.

If you enjoyed this review and think this may be the book for you, why not check out the Scar gatherer series here.

slaves for the isabella

You can’t make me go to Witch School

Want a copy of You can’t make me go to Witch School for yourself? Keep reading to find out how to enter my first ever giveaway!

About this book:

Daisy Wart, a Shakespearean actress with grand ambitions, is FURIOUS at being left at Toadspit Towers School for Witches by her grandmother. SHE IS NOT A WITCH! But Daisy soon becomes drawn into the mysteries of life at Toadspit, and finds that she even has a few magical surprises up her sleeve. . .

The adventures of Daisy the reluctant witch are perfect for fans of magical school stories.

Author: Em Lynas

Illustrator: Jamie Littler

Publisher: Nosy Crow

My Review:

Originally i thought that this book was going to be completely different to the one that was actually told because i have read other stories featuring witches and they are all…a bit… samey so i was pleasantly surprised!

Daisy was very fun to read about, she was very likeable and i understood her reluctance to attend the witch school when she genuinely felt that she was most definitely not a witch! A light and fun tale filled with excitement and the odd twist, You can’t make me go to Witch School was a joy to read. I thoroughly enjoyed the Shakespeare nods as A Midsummer Night’s Dream is one of my absolute favourites and this allowed for one of my favourite lines in the book to be uttered “You must all come and see my Bottom!”

Every page is an absolute visual pleasure, the little touches of illustrations in keeping with the story were a delight! I really enjoyed them.

I picked it up and just couldn’t put it down! The last line is everything! 🙂 

witch school

Fancy winning a copy of You can’t make me go to Witch School for yourself? Of course you do! Enter below.

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Word of Mouse

About this book:

James Patterson’s newest illustrated middle grade story follows the illuminating journey of a very special mouse, and the unexpected friendships that he makes along the way.

What makes Isaiah so unique? First, his fur is as blue as the sky—which until recently was something he’d never seen, but had read all about. That’s right—Isaiah can read, and write. He can also talk to humans…if any of them are willing to listen! After a dramatic escape from a mysterious laboratory, Isaiah is separated from his “mischief” (which is the word for a mouse family), and has to use his special skills to survive in the dangerous outdoors, and hopefully find his missing family. But in a world of cruel cats, hungry owls, and terrified people, it’s hard for a young, lone mouse to make it alone. When he meets an equally unusual and lonely human girl named Hailey, the two soon learn that true friendship can transcend all barriers.

Author: James Patterson/ Chris Grabenstein

Publisher: Penguin Random House

My review:

Firstly i’d like to start off by saying how much i enjoy books by James Patterson (and his co authors), i haven’t read a book by him yet that i haven’t liked!

I really liked this book. It looked interesting on first inspection and certainly didn’t disappoint. This was an easy read with chapters not really exceeding 5 pages and headed beautifully by a lovely quote by the mouse Isaiah.

I thought the plot was great, it’s very sweet and found myself invested in the story. Isaiah is instantly likeable and has a good head on his shoulders- he may be a small mouse but he has big ideas and an even bigger heart.

I thoroughly enjoyed the friendship between mouse and human child- it’s fun and quite lovely to see a friendship transcend expected barriers.

Easy enough to read in one sitting, this book is a great transition for younger children looking to read more complex stories without wanting to dive in at the deep end.

Suitable for older and younger readers alike.

Thank you to Toppsta and Penguin Random House for my copy of Word of Mouse.

word of mouse